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20131202
20131210
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MSNBCW 16
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Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)
a radical war of subversion. as howard mentioned there. and lawlessness. this is michele bachmann back again. this was today she was talking about the president's handling of the health care act rollout. here she is live and fresh. >> we've been appalled at the president's actions. they are clearly unconstitutional. you're not a king. you're not a dictator. you can't do whatever you want. he has rewritten the constitution for himself as a part of his effort to fundamentally transform of united states of america. >> you know, sam, i have a good memory about these things. didn't we have a long debate about the health care act? wasn't there a 60-vote majority at one point? there was a majority vote to deal with the numbers problems. it was done quite in broad daylight and passed by our u.s. congress in both houses by majority votes. and of course it was signed by the president in broad daylight. here she is enacting this or putting up this notion somehow there was something done under the table here. something unconstitutional and unknown before this moment. >> sure. well, i think one of the cr
. >> rubbing unger is a democrat strategist and michelle unger is from tv. >> and i like your formality. great to see you guys, rebbing, let me start wu. and there is new polls that are just out and talk about how the president's approval ratings are taking a hit on a whole host of issues. foreign policy; proval 38 percent. and immigration one of his other signature pieces and issues 35 percent approval. and federal budget that is carl cameron 32. and economy 38. and these are approval ratings. what is going on here? >> not surprising to be honest with you. once a president gets in the soup, all of the numbers have a way of coming down. combine that with the fact that people are not sure about the iran agreement and everything else, it is not a pretty picture. something happen today that may change the trajectory. >> which is what? >> i was those -- teasing you. >> the third quarter growth up to it 3.6 percent. i don't know if that were to hold but if it holds another quarter that could turn the president's fortunes around. >> that is one. michelle what about this? >> this is the first time si
michelle ebanks president of essence communications. thanks for being here tonight. we look forward to seeing you this summer in new orleans. and you can find all the information about the essence festival on our website, politicsnation.msnbc.com. thanks for watching. i'm al sharpton. "hardball" starts right now. >>> two days and counting. let's play "hardball." ♪ >>> good evening. i'm chris matthews in louisville, kentucky. let me start tonight with the big news. close to home news. and to this show. two nights from now president obama will be our guest. yours and mine on this show. he's agreed to sit with me before a big group of college students. that's right. the "hardball" college tour is back big time. and the biggest headliner, the president of the united states. we're going to be hitting my kbigest questions with the president before the students of american university. my questions will be the very ones you and i talk about here every night. this destructive politics we're facing in this country, this inability to strike compromise and how we can fix it, this failure of t
's not just crazy talk as crazy as it may sound. they're talking the legal talk here. congresswoman michele bachmann said on fox today that the president has rewritten the constitution for himself. listen to her. >> he doesn't want to be bound by any law, and that's the rub. the constitution says no man is above the law including the president of the united states. he has rewritten the constitution for himself as a part of his effort to fundamentally transform the united states of america. >> so with these kind of charges, i don't know how she claims he has rewritten it, but it begins the legal basis of trying to have a serious kind of discussion that is outrageous, ryan. >> sure. and she just lives in another world here. you know, in the real world where the rest of us live, there are progressive immigration activists who are, you know, begging the president to slow down on deportations because comprehensive immigration reform can't get through the house. and obama says, look, the laws are on the books. it's my job to carry out these laws. you know, if i could, i would stop these deportati
the beginning of a week-long program of mourning in his memory. let's go right now to nbc's michelle koh zin ski, who's in the middle of it all. michelle, a good evening your time. what are we seeing? >> reporter: hi, alex. right here this was a fence lined with some flowers outside the mandela property. now it has become several large hills full of flowers lined with people. you can imagine in churches around the world today mandela was mentioned. here today people were basically encouraged to do their own thing, to reflect on the melgszage of this champion of freedom. but in enormous numbers, people felt much better gathering together, includingmembers of mandela's family. it had the feeling of a sunday revival. here a few hundred gathered in a tent at mandela's offices, anything but quietly reflective, full of joy. >> we don't mourn quiet. we need to celebrate. we need to celebrate his life. >> reporter: the gospel choir that performed so many times for mandela in life, felt his loss. >> he will come and be telling us to feel at ease, how much he loves us. >> reporter: there were many service
because an executive of this company happened to be a classmate of michelle obama. but the main thing is in the private sector people would have been held accountable. if they didn't produce, they would have been gone. but from the government if people don't produce they put them on an extended vacation and slide them back in. lack of accountability is why they are not making any headway with this system. bill: today the white house is trying to turn the events forward. they will hold and event per day up to christmastime. extolling the virtues of the affordable care act. what's your expectation of how that go? >> my expectation is it's not going to work. people are not as stupid as the administration thinks they are. here is the other thing that's wrong with that. these cancellation notices are not theory. they hit real people in very personal ways. and when real people have been hit in terms of cancellations of their health insurance premiums or increases, if they take the new so-called standard, that's very real. the rhetoric and remark thing and rebranding i don't believe is going
-performing countries start to lap us. >> michelle rhee is the ceo and founder of students first and joins us now. michelle, are you surprised by what this new assessment is saying about american students or do you think that this is on track, knowing what you know about where our education system has been going? >> you know, actually it's not a surprise. american kids, their scores have not actually changed since the last time the test was administered, so it's not as if their scores have gone down, that's the problem. the issue is that other countries have leap frogged ahead of us, so you have countries like ireland and poland and as tonia that are scoring higher than we are. so we have become stagnant as a country while other nations are really pushing the envelope and growing at much, much faster rates than we are. >> so we talk about stagnation but the oecd, the organization administering this test found a strong connection between higher test scores and the students' school attendance and punctuality. programs like race to the top and now we see resistance to the common core curriculum, wha
'm! m'm! good.® ci'm bethand i'm michelle.. and we own the paper cottage. it's a stationery and gifts store. anything we purchase for the paper cottage goes on our ink card. so you can manage your business expenses and access them online instantly with the game changing app from ink. we didn't get into business to spend time managing receipts, that's why we have ink. we like being in business because we like being creative, we like interacting with people. so you have time to focus on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. >>> some of you may have seen just last week, the pope himself spoke about this at eloquent length. how can it be, he wrote, that it is not a news item when an elderly homeless person dies of exposure but it is news when the stock market loses two points? but this increasing inequality is most pronounced in our country. and it challenges the very essence of who we are as a people. >> the president earlier today at a major economic policy speech, defining the income inequality the defining problem of our time, adding it is not just the very rich in america.
to school, this country helped make sure we didn't go hungry. when michelle, the daughter of a shift worker at a water plant and a secretary, wanted to go to college, just like me, this country helped us afford it. until we could pay it back. so it drives me as a grandson, a son, a father, as an american is to make sure that every striving hard-working, optimistic kid in america has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. >> the same, the same incredible chance that this country gave him. it's a vision of fairness, jeopardized by a growing gap between rich and poor. look at this chart. this blue line shows the average income of the bottom 90% since 1960. in that time, the average income has grown by 22%. now let at the red line showing the income of the top 1%. look at that dramatic difference. the top 1% has grown by 271% in the same period of time. 271%. this is what president obama is fighting to change. and today he laid out his vision for the future, a vision of fairness, of equality and of opportunity in education, in worker's rights and a fair shot for everyone getting
hand. i'm bethand i'm michelle. and we own the paper cottage. it's a stationery and gifts store. anything we purchase for the paper cottage goes on our ink card. so you can manage your business expenses and access them online instantly with the game changing app from ink. we didn't get into business to spend time managing receipts, that's why we have ink. we like being in business because we like being creative, we like interacting with people. so you have time to focus on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. across the country has brought me to the lovely city of boston. cheers. and seeing as it's such a historic city, i'm sure they'll appreciate that geico's been saving people money for over 75 years. oh... dear, i've dropped my tea into the boston harbor. huhh... i guess this party's over. geico. fifteen minutes could save you fifteen percent or more on car insurance. see, i knew testosterone could affect sex drive, but not energy or even my mood. that's when i talked with my doctor. he gave me some blood tests... showed it was low t. that's it. it was a number. [
force, and that is where we need more alignment. >> michelle rhee, i really appreciate you taking time. >> absolutely. >> we'll be right back. if you're seeing spots before your eyes... it's time... for aveeno® positively radiant face moisturizer. [ female announcer ] only aveeno® has an active naturals total soy formula that instantly brightens skin. and helps reduce the look of brown spots in just 4 weeks. for healthy radiant skin. try it for a month. then go ahead and try to spot a spot. aveeno® positively radiant. naturally beautiful results. >>> joining me now, bob herbert, senior fellow, and schwartz economic policy analysis, i want to talk about the inequality, social mobility, the conversation i just had with michelle rhee about those issues. >> well, when you look at the education, my personal opinion is the so-called education reform movement is the biggest fraud in my opinion. one is we have been cutting funds to schools, look at chicago, we have been firing teachers over the past several years. >> particularly in the wake of the great recession. >> not responding when th
, this country helped make sure we didn't go hungry. when michelle, the daughter of a shift worker at a water plant and a secretary, wanted to go to college, just like me, this country helped us afford it until we could pay it back. so what drives me as a son, a grandson, a father, as an american is to make sure that every striving, hard-working, on the mystic kid in america has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. >> this is why he was elected, right then. because that grabbed me. the idea we came here and got on the escalator and got better off in this country than we would have gotten in whatever country we came from. the g.i. bill, these are opportunities that we get in this country to move up that escalator. and he was saying i was one of the people who went up that way. we can't stop that escalator. that grabbed me. but i get the feeling sometimes they're afraid to talk about poor people. you've been good politically in building a coalition between less well off people and better off people. it seems like the president's not afraid of it anymore. what do you think's cha
right now in black prison narrative. i'm studying michelle alexander and the narratives about prison systems in the united states, and we have a really aggressive criminal justice system that is racially biased, profiles people of color, women of color, and at the end of the day, we have to have media and other institutions step up and shine a light on it, because these three young men, thank god, are going to be exonerated for doing nothing, but unfortunately, the aggressiveness filters too many people into it who can't get out of it, who can't go on the lawrence o'donnell show and say this is wrong. this is a key issue, mass -- that's where it lives and breathes. at the end of the day, those police officers thought they were doing their job when they saw those young men. and this goes back to like the black codes. it goes back to moments in history that we look back on and say, wow, we don't want to be that america. we are that america. >> you know, technology plays such a role in this. when you think about the rodney king case, the reason we knew about it was the then relatively n
by enormous debt when they make the right decision to get higher education. and next week, michelle and i will bring together college presidents and non-profits to lead a campaign to help more low-income students attend and succeed in college. but -- [ applause ] while higher education may be the surest path to the middle class, it's not the only one. so we should offer our people the best technical education in the world. that's why we've worked to connect local businesses with community colleges so workers, young and old, can earn the new skills that earn them more money. and i've also embraced an idea that i know all of you at the center for american progress have championed. and by the way, republican governors in a couple of states have championed. that's making high-quality preschool available to every child in america. [ applause ] we know that kids in these programs grow up likely to get more education, earn higher wages, form more stable families of their own. it starts a virtuous cycle, not a vicious one. and we should invest in that. we should give all of our children that chan
wanna see you be brave ♪ i couldn't find a reason i'm bethand i'm michelle. and we own the paper cottage. it's a stationery and gifts store. anything we purchase for the paper cottage goes on our ink card. so you can manage your business expenses and access them online instantly with the game changing app from ink. we didn't get into business to spend time managing receipts, that's why we have ink. we like being in business because we like being creative, we like interacting with people. so you have time to focus on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. if every u.s. home replaced one light bulb with a compact fluorescent bulb, the energy saved could light how many homes? 1 million? 2 million? 3 million? the answer is... 3 million homes. by 2030, investments in energy efficiency could help americans save $300 billion each year. take the energy quiz. energy lives here. add brand new belongings from nationwide insurance and we'll replace stolen or destroyed items with brand-new versions. we put members first. join the nation. ♪ nationwide is on your side ♪ i just served my m
'm bethand i'm michelle. and we own the paper cottage. it's a stationery and gifts store. anything we purchase for the paper cottage goes on our ink card. so you can manage your business expenses and access them online instantly with the game changing app from ink. we didn't get into business to spend time managing receipts, that's why we have ink. we like being in business because we like being creative, we like interacting with people. so you have time to focus on the things you love. ink from chase. so you can. >>> the time for the healing of the wounds has come. the moment to bridge the chasm that divides us has come. >> that was nelson mandela in his 1994 inauguration speech. marcus, what did mandela see as his key role, his primary responsibility in the presidency? >> he saw it as reconciliation. he saw it as transitioning south africa from this country that could have exploded into a violent racial all-out war, civil war, to a country that was actually feasible, a country that could actually be a part of the world community, a country that actually stayed together. he knew abou
are learning that president obama and first lady michelle obama will travel to south africa next week to attend memorial event. former secretary of state madeleine albright spoke earlier. she paid tribute to former california congressman tom lantos and hillary clinton looking at her years of service. >> thank you very much. thank you to mica for your kind wonders and good morning. thank you to all of you. i am thrilled to be here. we're here to celebrate those who dedicated their lives to the human rights movement and we would be remised if we did not speak as to mica did to honor the passing of one of the movement's greatest heroes, nelson mandela. president mandela was a activist, political leader, a statesman and he was above all a teacher. he taught us that the power of forgiveness is greater áhan the power of hate and the differences of race and nationality matter less than our shared humanity. his presence on this earth will be sorely missed but his lessons will endure in the hearts of millions. this has in fact, become a very special event as part of what tom talked about an awful lot.
sister and me, this country made sure we didn't go hungry. when michelle, the daughter of a ship worker at a water plant and a secretary wanted to go to college, just like me, this country helped us afford it until we could pay it back. so it drives me as a grandson, a son, a father, as an american is to make sure that every striving, hardworking, optimistic kid in america has the same incredible chance that this country gave me. [applause] it has been the driving force between everything we've done these past five years. and over the course of the next year and for the rest of my presidency, that's where you should expect us to focus all of our efforts. [applause] now, you'll be pleased to know this is not a state of the union address. [laughter] and many of the ideas that can make the biggest difference in expanding opportunity i presented before. but let me offer a few key principles, just a road map that i believe should guide us in both our legislative agenda and our administrative efforts. to begin with, we have to continue to relentlessly push a growth agenda. it may be true that
Search Results 0 to 19 of about 20 (some duplicates have been removed)